Closeup of four Ngolyenoks sitting on a dead branch
Image by Nancye Miles-Tweedie

Ngolyenok

Carnaby’s (short-billed) Black Cockatoo
Zanda latirostris

Conservation status: Endangered

There are fewer than 40,000 Ngolyenoks left.

Listed as Endangered by the IUCN and Birdlife International.
Endangered Schedule 1 – Western Australian Wildlife Conservation Act.
Endangered under Federal Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act.

Image by Keith Lightbody

Call
Ngolyenoks make at least 15 different calls, most notably a ‘Which-ee-a, Which-ee-a’ call when flying. The call is also described as ‘Ngolyenok.’
Niche
Pollinate flowers, Spreads seeds, eats insect pest larvae. Messy eater provides food for ground-dwelling species.
Main Threats
Loss, fragmentation and degradation of their forest and woodland habitat to logging, mining, clearing and fire, including large trees with the hollows needed for breeding.
Large-scale clearing of Wheatbelt woodland where they breed is particularly devastating, as is ongoing clearing of the coastal Banksia and Tuart woodland where they migrate to feed in the non-breeding season. Many are also killed in car strikes feeding from roadside grain spills from trucks. Toxic Farm sprays can also cause paralysis of legs, sickness and death.

Image by Keith Lightbody

Lifespan
25 to 50 years
Size
Length 53–58 cm. Weight 500–790g.
Colour
Colour similar to the Ngolak (Baudins). Blackish feathers with brown hues tipped with dusky white (forming a scalloped edge pattern). White barred tail tipped with black edge.  Ngolyenok has a shorter, broader beak than the Ngolak, and breeds in woodlands more than forests.  
Male
Males have pink bare-skinned eye rings, dark grey beaks dusky white face patches. Females Females have dark grey bare-skinned eye rings, whitish beaks and bright white face patches. .

Image by Keith Lightbody

Distribution
The Ngolyenok is endemic to the South West of WA, north to the lower Murchison and east to Nabawa.
Food
Eucalyptus nuts, flowers and insect larvae from Marri trees and Eucalyptus, Corymbia and proteaceous plants such as Banksia Grevillea and Hakea. In the non-breeding season, they live closer to the coast and feed on Banksia and Tuart woodlands. They also eat exotic planted species such as macadamias, almonds, pines and Canola and other grains in the Wheatbelt.
Breeding  Monogamous pairs travel inland to the Wheatbelt to breed. Females find hollows mostly in old Salmon Gum and Wandoo from July to December. Usually just one chick per pair.