Black Cockatoo flying with tail featers fanned out
Image by Keith Lightbody

NGOLAK

Baudin’s (long-billed) Black Cockatoo
Zanda baudinii

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered.

There are less than 5,000 Ngolaks left.

Listed as Critically Endangered by IUCN and Birdlife International.
Listed as Endangered, Schedule 1 under the WA Wildlife Conservation Act
Listed as Endangered under Federal Environmental Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act.

Cockatoo on a Balga flower spike
Image by Keith Lightbody

Call
Ngolaks make several different calls. Most notably, the female calls ‘which-a’, duetting with the male, calling ‘Kuwee-a.’ The call of the Ngolak is similar but usually shorter than the Ngolyenok.
Niche
Pollinates flowers, spreads seeds, eats insect pest larvae. Being such messy eaters the remains of the plant material they drop provides food for ground-dwelling species.
Main Threats
Loss, fragmentation and degradation of their forest and woodland habitat to logging, mining, clearing and fire. Large trees with hollows needed for breeding take over 150 years to grow. They are often illegally shot on farms while seeking apple and pear seeds.

Image by Phillipa Beckerling

Lifespan
25 to 50 years
Size
Length 50–60 cm. Weight 560–770g
Colour
Colour is similar to Ngolyenok (Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo). Blackish feathers with brown hues and dusky white tips forming a scalloped edge pattern. White-barred tail tipped with black edge.  Ngolak has a longer thinner beak than the Ngolak and breeds more in forests than woodlands.  
Description
Males have pink bare-skinned eye rings, dark grey beaks dusky white face patches.
Females have dark grey bare-skinned eye rings, whitish beaks and bright white face patches.

Image by Keith Lightbody

Distribution
Ngolaks are endemic to the South West of WA. They range north to Gidgegannup, east to Wandering, and West to Eastern strip of Swan Coastal Plain including Midland Gosnells, Byford, Wokalup and Bunbury. They are also found in the Stirling and Porongurup Ranges and along the South Coast.
Food
Ngolaks forage at all levels from canopy to ground, feeding on insect larvae, nectar, buds, flowers and nuts. Ngolaks favour Jarrah, Marri and Karri, as well as seeds of Banksia, Hakea and fruiting apples and pears.
Breeding  
Forest-dwelling, monogamous pairs nest in hollows of Karri, Marri and Wandoo trees from August to December. The reproductive rate is low (0.6).